Urolithiasis and alpha blockers

What is the evidence for 'medical expulsive therapy' using alpha blockers?
Warren is a 58 year old man who presents with Right loin pain overnight. You suspect renal colic. His pain is significant, but not extreme, and he is keen to avoid ED if possible. How do you manage this in general practice? What is the best imaging? What Red Flags should you consider? What is the latest evidence for expediting recovery in the outpatient setting?

The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing and the nephrolithiasis is now recognised as a chronic and systemic condition. There are new evidence-based guidelines for the management of both acute renal stones and recurrent disease.

Watch this short video for an update on the evidence for 'medical expulsive therapy' using alpha blockers. You can also download our Keep it Simple Summary on Urolithiasis here.

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A/Prof Stephen Barnett

A/Prof Stephen Barnett

Stephen is GP Supervisor, Medical Educator, GP academic and Medical Director of Medcast. He has completed a PhD on Virtual Communities of Practice in GP Training.

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